The Bare Soul - September 26, 2010
Intercessory Praise, Part II

Job 42:10 - The LORD restored the fortunes of Job when he prayed for his friends, and the LORD increased all that Job had twofold.

Most of us have heard the expression "desperate times call for desperate measures". From the very underbelly of a dire situation can often spring the greatest triumphs. It can be a heart-wrenching moment when we hear about someone's tremendous loss. For example, how tragic it is when we hear a news report of an entire family losing all their children to a house fire. Horatio Spafford comes to mind as a modern man's illustration of extreme loss while Job is certainly the quintessential biblical example. Spafford and his wife lost a son in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. A short two years later, Spafford sent his wife and daughters on ahead of him to Europe. They were to meet up shortly after his arrival to help with evangelistic efforts on the continent. Tragically, the S.S. Ville Du Havre sank after striking another vessel at sea. His wife telegrammed her husband after her rescue saying, "Saved Alone". Later, when the ship he had booked passage came near to the spot where his daughters lie on the ocean floor, he penned the words of the famous hymn, It Is Well With My Soul. In this place of extreme loss, Spafford was able to praise His Creator regardless what life had dealt. By him penning these most poignant verses, he inadvertently became a witness and most importantly one who intercedes on behalf of many. By his example, countless Christians have been strengthened in their faith by Spafford as he stood between heaven and earth and praised the Almighty. He quite literally stood as an intercessory worshipper between God and man (for more see The Bare Soul - It is Well With My Soul - June 1, 2008).

Horatio Spafford had probably read of God's dealings with Job many times before that fateful day. Though millennia separated these two men, both experienced tremendous loss but likewise magnificent grace to deal with their given situations. Those familiar with the story know that Job was a God-fearing man that Satan demanded permission from God to tempt. Satan believed that any man, including Job, would forfeit their relationship with God to save their own skin. Job chapters one and two tell of how the devil caused great calamity to overtake the patriarch's household, first by destroying his children and his possessions and then by inflicting Job with severe bodily afflictions. From the subsequent chapters we read of Job's metamorphosis as a God-fearing worshipper to a man filled with the wisdom and revelation of His Maker. At one point, Job makes the declaration: Though He slay me, I will hope in Him. Nevertheless I will argue my ways before Him. (Job 13:15) Though his worship and praise of His Creator was unfaltering, he still questioned God's wisdom in allowing someone like himself who walked uprightly to be subjected to what appeared to be a cruel outcome. Only when Job truly heard and saw God (see Job chapters 38 through 41), did he understand that God is so much bigger than his feeble attempts to understand Him. In this instance, as well as countless others, God must merely be trusted without complaint or argument regarding His dealings with mankind. God's sovereignty and man's inability to understand God's ways is poignantly expressed in the following:

Job 42:1-6 - Then Job answered the LORD and said, "I know that You can do all things, and that no purpose of Yours can be thwarted. Who is this that hides counsel without knowledge? Therefore I have declared that which I did not understand, things too wonderful for me, which I did not know. Hear, now, and I will speak; I will ask You, and You instruct me. I have heard of You by the hearing of the ear; but now my eye sees You; therefore I retract, and I repent in dust and ashes."

After Job humbled himself appropriately before God, the Lord's attention then turned toward Job's friends (Job 42:7-9). Because of his newly gained perspective through worship and praise, Job was then able to be the instrument that God used to heal his friends. Job learned to be an intercessor by coming into a right relationship with God and thereby understanding the Almighty's omnipotent and omniscient power through his worship and praise. This was the catalyst to Job's own spiritual, physical, and material healing which therefore empowered him to pray for his friends restoration. Job obviously knew God before his calamities. Job 29 is all about his glorious past and how he was regarded as a man of God that delivered justice for those less fortunate. However, Job 42 is where we see a broken and contrite man who learns to pray for God's restoration rather than using his own abilities. We see a man equipped with the humility of God who is able to intercede for his friends through a heart of worship and praise to God.

Nowhere in scripture are we given such an intimate look of a man (of like character as us) who is transformed from a God-fearing believer to a man full of the wisdom and revelation of God. Job became that one who was not only a "good" man but a man who shared in the secret counsel of the Lord. By the epiphany of God's revelation through intercessory praise and worship, his prayers for his friends led to Job receiving back two-fold of what he formerly possessed (Job 42:10). Beloved, God has given us this portrait of Job not for good storytelling or nice poetry. He has allowed us to see that merely being a nominal Christian that loves God and does what is right is not near enough. The Lord is desirous that we would sit before him daily, crying out to Him for understanding until He would give us that same wisdom and revelation as Job. Through tremendous loss, God was able to take men like Horatio Spafford and the patriarch Job and transform them through what seemed like unbearable circumstances. Likewise, if we allow God to have His way with us, we will see that the world is much bigger than ourselves or our family's well-being. We will see God for who He is, praising and worshipping Him no longer for what He can do but for who He is. This wisdom will duly reveal Christ's mind and heart for those that so desperately need Him. Once we learn the secret of intercession, that it is an attitude first of worship and praise, then we can effectively bring others close to the Lord for His glory despite our experiences.

Lord Jesus, reveal to us Your wisdom and insight that we might intercede for others with hearts of praise and worship toward You, and hearts on fire for the souls of others. In Jesus' Name, Amen!

Your Barefoot Servant,

Rick

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