The Bare Soul - September 19, 2010
Intercessory Praise, Part I

The following is the message text and audio recording of a sermon titled "The Prayer of Praise" delivered to the homeless
at the Kansas City Rescue Mission Chapel on September 9 2010.

The Prayer of Praise - September 9, 2010

II Chronicles 20:22 - When they began singing and praising, the LORD set ambushes against the sons of Ammon, Moab and Mount Seir, who had come against Judah; so they were routed.

Intercessory Praise

What happens when a believer lives their life in all the light and revelation that the Lord has given, and then all of a sudden it seems like all hell comes against them? The inevitable result will always be fear. However, the type of fear will determine the outcome. If we fear the circumstances and shrink back in unbelief, then our predicaments will own us and defeat us. But, if we turn our faith to the Lord to fear Him and reverence Him for the outcome, then we have tapped into the springs of praise that will eliminate our enemies one by one. Jehoshaphat's life and subsequent defining battle with the enemies of Judah is a striking example regarding how the Lord can turn insurmountable difficulties into victories. Through this poignant encounter, the king learned the secret of how intercessory praise commands success through a rightly related king and kingdom to the Most High God.

II Chronicles chapters 17-19  gives an overview of the life of Jehoshaphat as he ruled and reigned in 8th century B.C. Israel. In II Chronicles 17:3-6, we see that the king sought the Lord God and strived to follow all the commandments of God. He expected no less from Judah, as he tore down the houses of worship of the Canaanite gods Baal and Ashtoreth. Not only was he a moral and spiritual crusader for his people, but other kingdoms saw that the favor of God was upon Israel so they would in turn bring tribute and gifts to the king in Jerusalem (II Chronicles 17:10-11). As a result, Jehoshaphat and the Judeans lived in relative peace until they heard the bad omen of a "great multitude" coming against them out of the land of Aram (II Chronicles 20:2). Naturally, the king was afraid when he heard this news (II Chronicles 20:3). At this point, the king could have done several things. He could have tried to make peace with the Ammonites and the Moabites, thereby sending them tribute and trying to appease them. He might have sent emissaries to Egypt or to the Philistines to try to hire an army to fight for Judah. Or, he might have decided to muster as many Judeans as possible and to go out against his foes, hoping for the best. He did none of these. Jehoshaphat instead did what would seem absurd to other kings of his time and turned to the Lord God in prayer and fasting (II Chronicles 20:3-13). The welfare of his people were at stake and so the king deliberately involved all the people to join him as they cried to the Lord for a solution to their dilemma. And, through the prophet Jahaziel, their answer came. The message from the Lord was not one of brilliant maneuvers or battle strategy to overcome their enemy by military force, but it was a simple yet terrifying prospect of "standing, and seeing the salvation of God" (II Chronicles 20:17). The next day, Judah went out to "battle" against their foes. Apparently, Jehoshaphat received some added direction from the Lord as he stationed the singers and musicians in front of their army to worship the Lord. If this wasn't sheer madness in the eyes of the rest of the world, the king then declared that they were to rejoice before the Lord saying "Give thanks to the LORD, for His lovingkindness is everlasting." (II Chronicles 20:21) Not only was he leaving his frontal attack defenseless, he was also giving away his position. However, the most remarkable thing occurred because of the king's obedience. We are told that the sons of Ammon and the sons of Moab destroyed themselves until there was not a single survivor (II Chronicles 20:22-24). Because of this remarkable victory, II Chronicles 20:30 tells us that for the rest of Jehoshaphat's reign his kingdom was at peace.

As it was in 8th century B.C. Israel, so it is today in the 21st century A.D. God is still looking for those whom He can show Himself strong on their behalf (II Chronicles 16:9). We don't need to be a king in order for God to show us a great deliverance. We only need to be, first and foremost, rightly related to Him. When we come to the Lord and we lay down our lives of sin, He then partners with us to destroy those "houses of Baal" in our hearts -- temples of self worship, greed, malice, envy, sloth, etc. When we become rightly related to God, then He allows us to help build His kingdom within the influence He gives us. We might see some helped by the ministry we give them, while others may be coming to the knowledge of the Lord through His grace in our lives. As our favor with God and man is on the rise, there is another who takes notice. The enemy of our soul will often acquiesce to our new found favor with God, but only for a season. He may even try to tell us that we're doing "really good" so that he can make us stumble in pride. But if that doesn't work, then he will inevitably send what seems like a multitude against us to defeat our standing in God and to try to destroy our credibility in God's kingdom. At this critical juncture, we will undoubtedly fear much like King Jehoshaphat. But that is okay, as long as we turn our fear to the Lord and reverence Him for how he is going to orchestrate His victory in this matter. As we have grown in God, the outcome of this battle not only affects us, but those whom we love and minister to. It has truly become an intercessory battle as we "stand in the gap" for the kingdom of God all around us. We have matured to not only be concerned with our welfare but that of others. Whether we are praying for God to heal a cancerous growth in a beloved sister in the Lord, or for a brother who is being audited by the IRS, we have learned to look beyond ourselves to praise God for the victory in the midst of the battle. We have learned that it is not our might or our strength or often anything on earth that can help in a given situation, other than the grace of God. We believe that saying to the problem "Give thanks to the Lord, for His lovingkindness is everlasting" is the only sensible solution to a world that believes we've gone mad for our assurance to do so.

To live a life of intercessory praise means we have first moved beyond simply praising God for His outcome in our lives and we've moved to a higher plain of doing so for others. If we are practicing this, we have taken on the very character of our Lord and Savior as He intercedes daily for us (Romans 8:34). Beloved, God wants us to first trust in Him for all our needs, and then to trust Him for all those whom He has given us within the "holy fiefdoms" He has entrusted to us. Whether it is our families or entire congregations, God desires that we entrust to Him the outcome of every situation with an attitude of praise. As we learn to intercede effectively for others, He will continue to expand our hearts and influence over His kingdom here on earth. That, my friends, is the way to create heaven on earth -- by thanking Him and praising Him for the victory while the battle looms ever present and menacing. It is then, that we will see the greatest miracles in our weakness as we give thanks to Him for His strength.

Heavenly Father, thank you for the gift of intercessory praise. Only as we confess our weakness, do we allow You to be strong. Through this strength, help us -- along with those You have entrusted to us that they might encounter Your triumph in the midst of what seems like overwhelming odds. Thank you that we are always victorious in You. In Jesus Name, Amen.

Your Barefoot Servant,

Rick

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